Building with a Variety of Materials

We are nearing the end of our Science units in grades two and three! The grade three students have been studying the unit on Building with a Variety of Materials.
What do you now know about building with a variety of materials?
Here are the curriculum outcomes for this unit. You can pick one and explain it or choose to explain something else you learned in this unit.

Overview
Students use a variety of tools and simple techniques to build things for specific purposes. Their tasks may require that a bridge be built between two desks, a model lookout tower be constructed, or a water container be made, all from available materials. Through these projects, students learn the value of safety and good workmanship and that different materials and designs can be used to obtain the same result.
They learn that working together on a common task is easier when ideas and materials are shared.

General Learner Expectations
Students will:

3–6 Use, safely, a variety of tools, techniques and materials in construction activities.
3–7 Construct structures, using a variety of materials and designs, and compare the effectiveness of the various materials and designs for their intended purposes.

Specific Learner Expectations
Students will:

1. Using a variety of materials and techniques, design, construct and test structures that are intended to:
· support objects
· span gaps
· serve as containers
· serve as models of particular living things, objects or buildings.

2. Select appropriate materials for use in construction tasks, and explain the choice of materials. Students should demonstrate familiarity with a variety of materials, such as papers, woods, plastics, clay and metals.

3. Select tools that are suitable to particular tasks and materials, and use them safely and effectively.

4. Understand and use a variety of methods to join or fasten materials.

5. Identify the intended purpose and use of structures to be built, and explain how knowing the intended purpose and use helps guide decisions regarding materials and design.

6. Understand that simple designs are often as effective as more complex ones, as well as being easier and cheaper to build, and illustrate this understanding with a practical example.

7. Recognize the importance of good workmanship, and demonstrate growth toward good workmanship.

8. Maintain and store materials and tools safely and properly.

9. Apply skills of listening, speaking and cooperative decision making in working with other students on a construction project.

Boats and Buoyancy

We are nearing the end of our Science units in grades two and three! The grade two students have been studying the unit on Boats and Buoyancy.
What do you now know about Boats and Buoyancy?
Here are the curriculum outcomes for this unit. You can pick one and explain it or choose to explain something else you learned in this unit.

Overview
Students explore what sinks and what floats, and what makes an effective watercraft. Through building and testing a variety of floating objects, students learn the importance of selecting appropriate materials and the importance of workmanship in shaping, positioning, fitting and waterproofing their constructions, so they will do the intended job. Along the way, students learn about balance and stability and about different methods that can be used in propelling a watercraft. The concept of density is informally developed in this topic.

General Learner Expectations
Students will:

2–7 Construct objects that will float on and move through water, and evaluate various designs for watercraft.

Specific Learner Expectations
Students will:

1. Describe, classify and order materials on the basis of their buoyancy. Students who have achieved this expectation will distinguish between materials that sink in water and those that float. They will also be aware that some “floaters” sit mostly above water, while others sit mostly below water. The terms buoyancy
and density may be introduced but are not required as part of this learning expectation.

2. Alter or add to a floating object so that it will sink, and alter or add to a nonfloating object so that it will float.

3. Assemble materials so they will float, carry a load and be stable in water.

4. Modify a watercraft to increase the load it will carry.

5. Modify a watercraft to increase its stability in water.

6. Evaluate the appropriateness of various materials to the construction of watercraft, in particular:
· the degree to which the material is waterproof (not porous)
· the ability to form waterproof joints between parts
· the stiffness or rigidity of the material
· the buoyancy of the material.

7. Develop or adapt methods of construction that are appropriate to the design task.

8. Adapt the design of a watercraft so it can be propelled through water.

9. Explain why a given material, design or component is appropriate to the design task.